Make the Most of Probate Records

In this course, you’ll learn all about how to use probate records to find your ancestors. Probate records are a tremendous source of genealogical information. Some family historians find them a little intimidating, though, and any don’t realize that even poor ancestors may have left behind a probate file chock-full of valuable information.

This one-week course is designed to help you quickly jump-start your work on the class topic. The course materials take about two hours to complete. This course is self-led and does not contain any graded exercises, but an instructor is available to answer any questions you have via the Discussion Board. In the time it takes to watch a movie, you’ll give your research skills a huge boost, and come away with new tools and techniques that you can use immediately.

Tuition:

$59.99 ($53.99 for VIP)

Course Length:

7 Days

Start Date:

Register any time and receive immediate access for 7 days.


WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

  • What probate records are (and how to find them)
  • Different types of probate records
  • Information you’ll find in a typical probate record
  • How to make it easier to access probate records
  • Why probate records are critical to your genealogical success

WHAT YOU’LL RECEIVE

  • A one-hour video presentation on using using probate records
  • A one-hour video case study that walks you through an actual probate record so you can see each document and learn what each one means
  • A PDF guide to the six things you need to know about using wills and probate records

WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE:

  • Anyone with ancestors who may have left probate records behind
  • Genealogists who are looking to build beyond-the-basics research skills
  • Anyone with two hours to spare who wants to learn skills they can apply immediately

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • This course assumes you understand the basics principles of genealogy. The first course in the First Steps series, Discover Your Family Tree, is a helpful foundation if you’ve never done genealogical research before.

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